This form is intended to help people interested in joining a unique community determine if what we are creating is also what you want to create. You will hear from us within 72 hours of receiving this form. The members of the group are accountable to each other and to the Community and are responsible for direct and open communication, transparency and how we share and distribute power. In addition to the agreements, NESAWG maintains certain assumptions that support the framework and activities of the conference. These assumptions were initially expressed by AORTA and are borrowed with gratitude! Group Policies/Community Agreements/Safer Space-Richtlinien are established by and for group members who share a particular space, i.e. Executive Committee/Board of Directors, Subcommittees, Community Meetings/Events. Other opportunities to reach group agreements may be better suited to shorter meetings or workshops or to groups that do not deal with emotional or controversial topics. This implies that making these decisions as a group is much more powerful than when a moderator sets “rules” that everyone must follow. In addition, it is much more likely that people will respect and implement an agreement to which they have contributed. It`s going to make your job as a moderator a lot easier.

In case of problems or conflicts, you can use this agreement (for example.B. we all agreed at the beginning that it is better for only one person to speak at the same time…). Whenever people come together as a group, we form both a community and a culture. At the NESAWG conference, we are looking for a respectful, comfortable, open, curious and friendly community and culture. Community agreements help us to find concrete ways to create this culture and to talk about conflicts and conflicts without creating them. With these practices and tools, we can challenge ourselves and each other, while realizing that we all come from different places of knowledge and transformation. You can also use group agreements for group project jobs. Give each group time to develop their own agreements on how they will work together.

This can help relieve stress from ambiguous expectations of group work, help students defend themselves, and resolve conflicts together. Recently, I have been rethinking community agreements. When is it better to propose principles to the group and when is it better for a group to create its own? For my graphic presentation practice workshops, I could start the room with a poster like the one in the image above – and ask the group if they have any changes or additions. Thus, setting the tone of the front in space works well – but only in situations with little conflict. . . .